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09 August 2019

$5.58m aimed at improving and repairing Queensland’s waterways, Great Barrier Reef, soil and plant life.

$5.58m aimed at  improving and repairing Queensland’s waterways, Great Barrier Reef, soil and plant life. 
Two central Queensland resources management groups will have a share in Palaszczuk Government funding of $5.58m aimed at  improving and repairing Queensland’s waterways, Great Barrier Reef, soil and plant life. 
The money is being channelled into 13 independent natural resource management groups which are hard at work improving and repairing Queensland’s waterways, Great Barrier Reef, soil and plant life. 
The groups – the Fitzroy Basin Association and Desert Channels Queensland – will receive a combined $1.63 million on top of $1.05 million the Palaszczuk Government already has invested into projects aimed at improving the region’s soil, plant life, and waterways.
“The Palaszczuk is investing more than $880,000 to increase native woody vegetation across areas at risk of erosion in the Fitzroy Basin,” Member for Rockhampton Barry O’Rourke said.
“With this funding boost, the Fitzroy Basin Association will be working to increase soil stability and improve nutrient and water cycling in targeted areas,’’ Mr O’Rourke said.
“Desert Channels, which is working with landholders to stabilise streambanks and increase ground cover vegetation in the upper reaches of the Diamantina and Western Rivers, will receive $375,000 towards staffing, and monitoring, evaluation, and reporting improvements.’’
Desert Channels Group Chief Executive Officer Leanne Kohler said the group was working to improve land and waterways ravaged by both drought and floods.
“Our project covers more than 140,000 hectares on the headwaters of the Diamantina River and adjoining the famed Combo waterhole, that was ravaged by drought for five years and then subjected to floods in February 2019—which scoured the landscape, destroyed fences and washed away stock,” she said.  
“The project is investing in people and works to reduce wind, water and weed threats in the area to improve the land condition, riparian habitat and biodiversity, while maintaining profitability and preparing for changes in climate variability.”
Ms Kohler said seven field days, workshops and demonstrations to landholders and community members were already planned in the18 months, which would help strengthen land management practices. 
The Palaszczuk Government has now invested more than $37 million into Queensland’s Natural Resources Investment Program 2018-2022 to support the development of new and more efficient processes, technologies, activities and tools to improve, repair and restore Queensland’s natural assets.
“In just 12 months, 26 projects have taken root across the state to protect our natural resources and help ensure Queensland’s land, soil and water will be able to support multiple industries into the future,” Dr Lynham said.

Government Image: Desert Channels is working to reduce wind and water erosion threatening waterholes in the Diamantina River.

Source: Minister for Natural Resources, Mines and Energy
The Honourable Dr Anthony Lynham


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